The Lowdown on North Carolina’s Brunch Bill

If you are a North Carolinian, you may have heard a lot of buzz in the last few months about the “brunch bill”. But do you really know what’s going on with it?

The “brunch bill”, which is actually Senate Bill 155 and contains a plethora of other changes to North Carolina’s liquor laws, would allow stores and restaurants to begin selling beer and alcohol starting at 10 a.m. on Sundays (it was previously noon). The bill was signed into action by Governor Roy Cooper on June 30 however local municipalities have to approve the bill for their own communities before the law could go into effect.

Surprisingly not everyone has been on board with this bill and some communities (such as Kure Beach, Nags Head, and New Bern) did not reach the 2/3 majority of votes needed to pass it. From my reading, it seems like the biggest reason the bill did not pass was because of morality reasons – people fear that by selling alcohol earlier on a Sunday, it would deter individuals from going to church or that it would ruin the “family” atmosphere of a tourist area.

Seriously? The beaches are already covered with cigarette butts, beer cans, and other less than savory items in these “family” areas. You walk an extra block in some cute little historic town and may find yourself in a crime ridden neighborhood where heroin needles linger in the gutters. I think our communities need to focus a bit more on fixing their already existing issues than trying to blame those issues on something that hasn’t even come to fruition yet.

But I digress.

I’m not a big drinker myself. I might have one Corona on occasion or a pumpkin beer during the season, but that’s about the extent of it. Does it matter to me about picking up a 6-pack from the grocery store at 11:30 a.m.? Not really. Even though I rarely consume alcohol, I still see the need for North Carolina’s Brunch Bill to pass.

Why?

Revenue.

Living off the cuff of North Carolina’s coast, we receive a lot of tourists to this area. A lot of tourists who support our local businesses and would more than likely not attend church in the area anyway. These are typically families who aren’t going to go wild and crazy and turn into lushes at 10 a.m. on a Sunday morning. They are the ones who are going to want to go out, have someone else prepare their breakfast, and enjoy a mimosa or two with their family.

This is the opportunity to drive additional business to our areas. Instead of staying home and fixing their own drinks, people could spend the money out in the community. They could support our local restaurants and shops. The price of one bloody mary may not seem like it would make much difference, but if that person then decides to wander into the shop next door, then multiple people benefit.

The majority of restaurants seem to be in favor of the “brunch bill” but as the communities in North Carolina continue to vote, it’ll be interesting to see the overall outcome.

What do you think about the “brunch bill”? If you aren’t in North Carolina, what time does alcohol sales start on Sunday in your area?

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Sweet and Tart Spaghetti and Meatballs

Disclaimer: This post is brought to you in conjunction with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Back when I lived in Raleigh, I used to love to visit the Got to be NC Festival. It was like the State Fair but with more emphasis on local. Seeing all the local food vendors made my heart sing.

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Got to be NC Festival | Logo Used With Permission

Before this year’s event, I had the opportunity to speak one of the Homegrown Fare vendors, Fadia House of Floury Apron. Fadia started Floury Apron after her kids went to college. She’s always enjoyed cooking and creating new recipes and wanted to share her unique take on Eastern and Western flavors with others.

When asked if she had any advice to offer others interested in starting their own food-based company, she had this is say, “Love what you do and do it correctly.  Work hard and learn your customer’s needs and fulfill it.  Ask questions, attend seminars.”

While a few of her products are sold at Southern Season in Chapel Hill, they can also be purchased directly from her website.

Some of her products include wheat crackers (in flavors like zaatar and parmesan) and baklawa but her best selling product is her Sweet and Tart Tomato Sauces. Available in oregano, ginger, or spicy, her sauces are a great accompaniment to items like meatloaf, hot dogs, and my personal pick – spaghetti and meatballs!

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There is nothing simpler for me to fix after a long day of work than spaghetti and meatballs. Sometimes I will use jarred spaghetti sauce from the store, sometimes I will use our own tomato base that we can every year. This recipe uses store bought sauce for ease. Once the sauce is prepared, you can start to relax as everything bubbles away together. While Fadia’s Sweet and Tart Tomato Sauces are not intended as a substitute for spaghetti sauce, it is a great addition.

Sweet and Tart Spaghetti and Meatballs
(serves 6-8)

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. spaghetti, cooked al dente in salted water
  • 2-30 oz. jars of your favorite pasta sauce
  • 1-16 oz. jar of Floury Apron’s Sweet and Tart Tomato Sauce, Oregano
  • 1/2 lb. lean ground beef
  • 1/2 lb. spicy Italian sausage, casing removed
  • 1 eggs
  • 1/4 cup. panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 cup parmesan cheese

Directions:

  1. Place spaghetti sauce and the Sweet and Tart Tomato Sauce in a large saucepan and simmer over medium heat.
  2. In large bowl mix together beef, Italian sausage, egg, panko, garlic, salt and Parmesan.
  3. Shape into 9 large meatballs.
  4. Place meatballs in simmering sauce.
  5. When sauce returns to a simmer, cover and cook 50-60 minutes till cooked through.
  6. Serve sauce and meatballs over your spaghetti.

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Don’t forget to check out Floury Apron’s booth at the Homegrown Fare presented by Lowes Foods May 19-21 at the N.C. State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. The event, part of the annual Got To Be NC Festival, will feature 100 local food, wine and beer companies. Admission is $3, but you can get in free with your Lowes Foods loyalty card. Plus, you can get a free gift while supplies last by mentioning this blog at the Got To Be NC merchandise booth. More information about the Homegrown Fare and the Got To Be NC Festival is available at www.gottobencfestival.com

Also something neat to think about is that when you go and make a purchase in the Homegrown Fare tend, swing by the Got to be NC booth so you can get a selfie in the frame. Make sure to use #homegrownfare17 when you share it!

Want to see what everyone else made? Check out these Got to be NC Blogger Posts for #HomeGrownFare17

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Expressing My Excitement to Come!

(Note: I’m filling this posts with pictures of some of the food I made when I lived in Raleigh – pulling these from my defunct flickr stream)

When I lived in Raleigh (in what seems like another lifetime now), I tended to shop at either Food Lion or Harris Teeter (depending on where I was living at the time) with visits to Whole Foods every other week. Mostly to enjoy the prepared foods bar, but also to view what new and unusual products they had in the produce section. Typically it was items that I could either not afford on a student’s budget or thought I didn’t like (such as mushrooms) but it was fun to view them. I think that was the budding foodie in me starting to emerge. About once a month or so, I would venture over to Trader Joe’s – that was back when “Two-Buck Chuck” was actually $2. If you are a Trader Joe’s fan, then you’ll know what I’m referring to.

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A delicious chicken & vegetable soup I made using brother, corn, potatoes, carrots, spices, and a rotisserie chicken back in October 2010.

Since moving back home, my grocery store choices have been limited to Food Lion, mostly to supplement what I can’t grow myself. Sure there are a couple of other grocery options (Farm Fresh and a small health food store), but I find their prices are typically higher for the same products I find in Food Lion. As the years passed, I found myself missing my Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s. Finally, my mom and I ventured up to a Whole Foods in Virginia and you would have thought that I was a kid in a candy store. It was heaven even though I didn’t buy much, if anything. Fast forward to dating my boyfriend. We were bored one weekend and after driving up to Bass Pro Shops, we traveled a bit further to Trader Joe’s. I think that it when he started to see the magic.

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My dinner in March 2010 – pork roast and frozen potatoes from Trader Joe’s (the potatoes were delicious) and cucumbers from a family recipe.
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Trader Joe’s purchases from March – the potatoes and pork roast pictured above are included.

Half a year later, I took him up to Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s and he realized that they really had some awesome things and that it wasn’t just for “hippies”. Though we spent more than we probably should have at both stores (but how could he resist the olive bar??), we made a vow that we would try to go a few times per year.

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Chicken katsu with tonkatsu sauce and cucumbers from the same family recipe as before. I crave this meal (from October 2009) even now.

So guess what time it is now? YES, it is time for our quarterly trip. Our last trip was over the summer so I wasn’t able to get the frozen items I wanted but I have a few days off from work between Christmas and New Year’s making it the perfect time for our little adventure. We are making the effort during the next two weeks to empty our fridge, freezer, and pantry of as much food as possible with no trips to the grocery store.

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Preparing for the Superbowl in February 2010 – I made shrimp dip, pigs in a blanket, velvetta cheese dip, and we had oreos.
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Shrimp dip (as mentioned above) – this recipe will be coming soon!
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